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and a desire to know." ~  Pres. John Adams 
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Posted 2/1/2016

 

The City of Oelwein has declared a snow emergency effective at midnight tonight (or at 12:00 AM on February 2nd, 2016). The snow emergency will remain in effect until Noon on February 4th, 2016. Any vehicles left parked on emergency snow routes will be subject to tow. Also in effect will be alternate side parking for non-snow emergency routes.

1. Restricted Street and Avenue Parking: After declaration of a snow removal emergency by the Mayor of the City of Oelwein and publication of notice of the parking restriction herein, it shall be unlawful for any person to park or leave unattended or unoccupied any vehicle along the curbside of any public street or avenue between the hours of midnight and 9:00 P.M. on the side of such street or avenue on which houses are identified with even numbered addresses on even numbered days of the calendar and on the side of such street or avenue on which houses are identified with odd-numbered addresses on odd-numbered days of the calendar. Said parking restriction shall apply until said restriction is lifted by subsequent declaration of the mayor by radio or newspaper announcement.

 

2. Restricted Parking in Municipal Parking Lots. After the declaration of a snow removal emergency by the Mayor of the City of Oelwein and publication of notice thereof, it shall be unlawful for any person to park or leave unattended or unoccupied any vehicle in the North Municipal Parking Lot; the municipal parking lot located in the 100 Block of 1st Avenue SW, and, the City Hall Municipal Parking Lot, on even numbered days of the calendar and in the South Municipal Parking Lot; and the municipal parking lots located on the East and West side of the 10 Block of 1st Avenue NE, on odd numbered days of the calendar until said restriction is lifted by subsequent declaration of the Mayor by radio or newspaper announcement.


Now Hiring OPD Telecommunicator Picture

Visit www.oelweinpolice.org for more information.

 


 

 

Visit the Oelwein Police Department's website

for an easy way to report 

property nuisance violations in Oelwein.

Click on the red tab along the left side of the screen

on their website called

"Report Property Nuisance Violation"

and fill out the form.

Citizens may still call the Oelwein Police Department

at 319-283-4311 to report violations.

 


 

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.  Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to:

Oelwein City Clerk, 20 Second Avenue SW, Oelwein, IA 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 


free-clip-art-water
Turn them in to the Oelwein City Hall, 20 2nd Ave SW, when completed.

 
The City of Oelwein publishes agendas and minutes of every city council meeting which are generally open to the public (unless under state law - a closed session is authorized) every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month. To have an item placed on the agenda please contact Oelwein City Hall at 319-283-5440.  We also encourage you to discuss any issues related to city business with the department head or the appropriate City Official for your issue or concern.

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to

Oelwein City Clerk

20 Second Avenue SW

Oelwein Iowa 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 
Safety

NationalWeatherService

Weather Conditions - National Weather Service Forecast for Oelwein

----------

 snowman

From chilling temperatures to slippery sidewalks, winter is a season that brings unique safety concerns. Keep your family cozy and safe this winter by remembering a few important tips.

Staying Safe at Home this Winter

Winter comes with a few hazards for homeowners, but there are plenty of things you can do to protect your property and your family. Keep these tips in mind.

Request a Home Heating Inspection

The fact that your central heating unit, space heater, or fireplace was working properly at the end of last season does not mean it's ready for this winter. Before frigid temperatures set in, hire a professional to conduct a safety inspection of your heating units, as well as your fireplace's flue and chimney.

If any potential risks are found, act immediately to remedy them. If you'll be using space heaters, make sure your rooms have proper ventilation and that the units are not placed near anything flammable. Using unsafe heating systems can result in fire, injuries, or carbon monoxide poisoning.

Be Aware of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 400 people die annually of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless vapor that is sometimes produced by gas furnaces and space heaters. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include nausea, dizziness, severe headache, confusion, and unconsciousness. If you notice these symptoms in yourself or a family member, go to the emergency room right away.

If you have a central gas heater, use gas-powered space heaters, or have a fireplace, install carbon monoxide detectors in your home. These inexpensive devices, which are available from retailers, provide a warning if you have elevated carbon monoxide levels in your home. Even if you already have detectors, make sure they are in proper working order and change the batteries so you can be certain that they're fresh.

Protect Your Plumbing

When temperatures dip below freezing, it's important to take steps to prevent ruptured plumbing. To prevent burst pipes, leave water dripping slightly so that water is constantly running through them to reduce the chances of freezing. Additionally, open the cabinets in which indoor pipes are housed so they are exposed to the warmest temperatures in your home. Outdoor pipes should be wrapped with sufficient insulation to reduce exposure to the elements. Never leave a hose attached to an outside faucet during the winter months.

Clear Snow and Remove Ice

According to the CDC, falls are the number one cause of injuries to adults. Many of these falls happen when sidewalks, driveways, and walkways are covered in snow and ice. Make sure any of these surfaces around your home are shoveled regularly and free from debris. Keep in mind that simply clearing the snow may not be enough to keep the area safe; ice is always a concern during the winter. Your regular routine for keeping access to your home clear should include adding sand or rock salt to slippery spots. Pay particular attention to stairs, since they can be hazardous and icy in colder months.

Always be careful when clearing snow and ice around your home, and keep a few snow removal safety tips in mind.

Prepare for Winter Storms

If you live in an area prone to winter storms, it's important to plan for them early in the season. Stock up on the following supplies:

  • Battery-powered radio
  • Flashlights and lanterns, with spare batteries
  • Drinking water
  • Non-perishable food that doesn't require cooking
  • Baby food and formula, if needed
  • Pet food
  • Prescription medications
  • First aid kit

Winter Activity Safety Tips

In addition to making sure that your home is prepared and stocked to deal with the winter weather situations that you can expect as the days get shorter and the temperatures drop, it's also important to consider winter safety tips for the activities that you and the other members of your family are likely to participate in this time of year.

Know the Signs of Hypothermia

According to the National Institute of Health, anyone who spends extended periods outside in cold winter temperatures is at risk for hypothermia. Hypothermia can happen when your body temperature drops from its usual 98.6 degrees. It is a medical emergency if a person's temperature is 95 degrees or less.

In addition to the lowered temperature, someone experiencing hypothermia may have the following symptoms:

  • Confusion
  • Clumsiness and stumbling
  • Dizziness and drowsiness
  • Apathetic mental state
  • Shivering
  • Slurred speech
  • Weak pulse and slow breathing

Dress Appropriately

When heading outdoors to participate in wintertime activities, whether you'll be hiking, skiing, shoveling snow from your driveway, or any other outdoor activity, make sure that you dress warmly. It's wise to dress in layers when you'll be exerting yourself in frigid temperatures so that you can start out properly insulated and then shed layers as your body temperature starts to rise as a result of your level of activity.

Make a point of wearing clothing made from synthetic materials to help conserve body heat. Avoid wearing clothing made from cotton fibers. If cotton gets wet, it takes some time to dry and during that time, you run the risk of becoming severely chilled and losing much-needed body heat.

Use Caution on Frozen Lakes and Rivers

According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, it can be very difficult to tell whether ice is solid just from looking at it. The color or thickness of the ice will not necessarily tell you how much weight it can support. In general, new ice, which has formed in the last couple of weeks, is stronger than ice that has been there for months. Ice on moving water, such as rivers, is generally weaker than ice on lakes.

Always consult your local DNR about ice safety before heading out on the lake for ice fishing, ice skating, or other sports.

Use Proper Equipment

Skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyable winter pastimes, but you still need to keep personal safety in mind when you venture out onto the slopes. Wearing a helmet will help to prevent head injuries. If you don't own the right equipment, rent it from the ski resort.

Many winter sports require specific equipment. Make sure that your equipment is in good condition and properly maintained. For example, snow skis need to be properly waxed, ice skate blades need to be sharpened, and snowmobiles should be serviced at the beginning of each season. It's also important to make sure that sized items, such as snow ski boots and ice skates, are properly fitted. Because children grow so rapidly, there's a good chance they'll need a larger size each season.

Take Regular Breaks

Taking breaks at regular intervals is a good idea when you are enjoying the great outdoors in the winter. Go inside to warm up and get a snack and something to drink. While it may tempting to go on one more run as the day winds down, a safer choice may be not to push yourself if you are already tired.

Tell Someone About Your Plans

Before you head out in the snow, tell someone where you are going and what time you will be coming back. That way, if you are overdue, someone can alert authorities to start searching for you.

It's also important to stay on well-marked trails. Take a trail map with you and keep track of where you are while snowmobiling or skiing.

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

safety

The City of Oelwein and the Oelwein Police Department reminds citizens to do their part on the streets of Oelwein. Barricades and warning lights reminds drivers to slow down, obey traffic signs or lights.  Construction zones are needs to address traffic issues or repair city utilities.  Your cooperation and safety awareness is greatly appreciated.

 

 
Current City News

 

Making 2016 Oelwein’s Best

Mayor of Oelwein Peggy Sherrets is looking forward to the New Year and “continuing to move forward.”

Mayor Sherrets said that the city of Oelwein has a “great city council now,” and one that is younger, stable, and more diverse.

Working together with the positive, forward looking council, Mayor Sherrets is quick to recognize that the old negative attitudes that loomed over the city have since gone away.

“It has been very positive and upbeat around town,” said Mayor Sherrets.

Mayor Sherrets hopes to increase discussion with the public in 2016 and hear their grievances in an effort to continue improving communication and increase positive attitudes in town.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

Sherrets sworn in as Oelwein’s 36th mayor

Mayor Peggy Sherrets took the oath of office Wednesday morning, Dec. 30, to begin her first full two-year term at the helm of city government. Sherrets has served as Oelwein’s mayor since winning a special election in October 2014.

As she signed the official paperwork, Sherrets became the 36th mayor for the city and the second female to hold its highest office.

Sherrets began in city government as 1st Ward Councilman elected in 2011. Among her duties was being appointed as the council’s pro-tem mayor. She proved her mettle two years later when scandal hit the mayor’s office and she was forced to assume mayoral duties.

Refusing to let allegations of another factor into the workings of the city, Sherrets made “moving forward” a practical solution to righting the ship in rocky waters.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

City Elections Tuesday, Nov. 3rd

Oelwein Mayor Peggy Sherrets received 437 votes

At-Large Councilman: Darin Christensen received 319 votes over incumbent Paul Ryan with 268 votes

First Ward Councilman: Matt Weber received 147 votes

Third Ward Councilman: Lou Ann Milks received 103 votes

 

 

 

Council works on cleaning up neighborhoods

The Oelwein City Council approved measures on three properties Monday night aimed at improving neighborhoods.

The first was a resolution setting a public hearing for 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 to propose disposal by sale of the city’s interest in 105 S. Frederick, the former Iowa Motors building.

The second was setting a public hearing also at 5 p.m. Nov. 9 for disposal by sale of the city’s interest in 136 Fourth Ave. S.W. Roger Boleyn, who at one time previously owned the property, has expressed interest. City Attorney Ron VanVeldhuizen reported Boleyn intends to purchase the property and take down the house.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

Oelwein’s Mercy Hospital part of Wheaton’s merge with Mercy Health Network

Mercy Hospital in Oelwein along with Covenant Medical Center in Waterloo and Sartori Hospital in Cedar Falls, will be transferred to the Des Moines based Mercy Health Network.

The Wheaton Franciscan Sisters have announced their intent to form a new relationship for their Iowa hospitals and services located in Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and Oelwein. The intention is for these organizations to join Mercy Health Network (MHN), based in West Des Moines, an integrated system of hospitals, clinics and other health and patient care facilities working to achieve the “triple aim goals” of better health care services, better health, and higher efficiency. The transfer is contingent upon final negotiations of definitive agreements, the receipt of all required approvals, and is expected to take place in the first quarter of calendar year 2016.

The Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare hospitals, clinics and other services including Covenant Medical Center, Sartori Memorial Hospital, and Mercy Hospital of Franciscan Sisters, Oelwein, are the subjects of the proposed transfer.

 Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

East Penn Manufacturing Company in Oelwein a step closer in $64 million expansion

East Penn Manufacturing Company of Oelwein is on the verge of a $64 million expansion project.

East Penn was recently awarded $1,750,000 in direct financial assistance as well as tax benefits through Iowa’s High Quality Jobs program, including over $2.2 million over five years in investment tax credits and over $800,000 in refunds of sales, service or use taxes paid during construction. The project is expected to create 350 jobs at a starting wage of at least $13.55 per hour.

In addition, the City of Oelwein would match the State of Iowa’s requirements for High Quality Jobs program, as well as a required match to a DOT Rise grant, and offer tax rebate incentives to East Penn Manufacturing.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

Oelwein’s Kate Stewart crowned Iowa Dairy Princess

Northeast Iowa continues as state Dairy Princess territory with the crowning of Kate Stewart of Oelwein as the 2015 Iowa Dairy Princess. Kate was crowned the 62nd Iowa Dairy Princess by outgoing Princess Mikayla Lien of Calmar, during an evening ceremony at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines Wednesday, Aug. 12.

Kate, 18, is the daughter of Matt and Diana Stewart, and the youngest of the five Stewart siblings that include, Jared, Lindsey, Chelsea, and Daniel. She graduated from Oelwein Community High School in May, where she enjoyed participating in Concert Choir, played the French horn in band, played volleyball and basketball. She is the granddaughter of Norma and the late James Stewart of Oelwein, and Barbara Jean and the late Mike Frick of Sibley.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

Williams Center announces its upcoming season line-up

The Williams Center for the Arts in Oelwein, Iowa, is announcing that the purchase of season memberships is now open to the general public.  Each ticket is $150 for Adults.  All season memberships must be purchased at the Oelwein Chamber and Area Development Office.  (319-283-1105)

All of the Center sponsored events are good with the purchase of a Season Membership.  Members also are given the opportunity to select their seats for the entire season.  

All shows start at 7 p.m.

Click here for the 2015-2016 Season Calendar

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 
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