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"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right
and a desire to know." ~  Pres. John Adams 
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Click here for the

City of Oelwein's Snow and Ice Policy

 

Snowmobile and All-Terrain Vehicles Ordinance

Click above on "City Code" and scroll down to Article IX (page 364)

to read about our snowmobile and all-terrain vehicles ordinance.



NEW

 

Visit the Oelwein Police Department's website

for a new, easy way to report 

property nuisance violations in Oelwein.

Click on the red tab along the left side of the screen

on their website called

"Report Property Nuisance Violation"

and fill out the form.

Citizens may still call the Oelwein Police Department

at 319-283-4311 to report violations.

 


 

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.  Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to:

Oelwein City Clerk, 20 Second Avenue SW, Oelwein, IA 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.


free-clip-art-water
Turn them in to the Oelwein City Hall, 20 2nd Ave SW, when completed.

 
The City of Oelwein publishes agendas and minutes of every city council meeting which are generally open to the public (unless under state law - a closed session is authorized) every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month. To have an item placed on the agenda please contact Oelwein City Hall at 319-283-5440.  We also encourage you to discuss any issues related to city business with the department head or the appropriate City Official for your issue or concern.

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to

Oelwein City Clerk

20 Second Avenue SW

Oelwein Iowa 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 

 
Safety

NationalWeatherService

Weather Conditions - National Weather Service Forecast for Oelwein

----------

 snowman

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

 WINTER SAFETY TIPS

Courtesy of American Academy of Pediatrics

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.

 Hypothermia

  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.

Frostbite

  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
  •  If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.

Winter Health

  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
  •  Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
  •  Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.

Winter Sports and Activities

  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.

Ice Skating

  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate

Sledding

  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.

Snow Skiing and Snowboarding

  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.

Snowmobiling

  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
  • Travel at safe speeds.
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.

 Sun Protection

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

Fire Protection


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Practice fire drills with your children
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping

- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

safety

The City of Oelwein and the Oelwein Police Department reminds citizens to do their part on the streets of Oelwein. Barricades and warning lights reminds drivers to slow down, obey traffic signs or lights.  Construction zones are needs to address traffic issues or repair city utilities.  Your cooperation and safety awareness is greatly appreciated.

 
Current City News

Oelwein Police Winter Coat Drive

2014 Winter Coat Drive Graphic

 

The Oelwein Police Department is sponsoring a winter coat drive during the months of November and December 2014 to ensure that our neighbors of all ages are warm this winter season. The Oelwein Police Department will be welcoming donations of new and slightly used winter coats, hats, gloves, scarfs, and monetary donations during this drive to be used locally within our community.

 

To donate simply come to the police department with your donation (501 Rock Island Rd) or call the police department administrative line (319-283-4311) and we will be more than happy to come to you and all donations can be kept anonymous. Visit www.oelweinpolice.org for more information.

 

 

Oelwein Homecoming Parade 2014 Pictures

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9-26-14OelweinHomecoming17

 

 

RAGBRAI 2014 a Success in Oelwein

 

RAGBRAI2014 3

RAGBRAI2014 4

 

City of Oelwein Held The Annual Safety Awards Ceremony on July 16, 2014

The city of Oelwein takes safety seriously. Each year they hold a Safety Awards Ceremony to not only reward employees but to promote work safety. The annual Safety Awards Ceremony (for fiscal year 2013-2014) was held on July 16th, 2014 at the Grand Theatre of Oelwein and the Oelwein Community Plaza. The city employees that were in attendance were presented with certificates showing how many continuous hours they worked without an injury. All of the city departments and city employees in attendance were presented with certificates from Oelwein City Council members Paul Ryan and Renee Cantrell and Administrator Jamie Letzring.

7-16-14SafetyAdmin

Administration

7-16-14SafetyCemetary

Cemetary

7-16-14SafetyFire

Fire

7-16-14SafetyLibrary

Library

7-16-14SafetyParks

Parks

7-16-14SafetyPolice

Police

7-16-14SafetyStreets

Streets

7-16-14SafetyUtilities

Utilities

 
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