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"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right
and a desire to know." ~  Pres. John Adams 
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Visit the Oelwein Police Department's website

for an easy way to report 

property nuisance violations in Oelwein.

Click on the red tab along the left side of the screen

on their website called

"Report Property Nuisance Violation"

and fill out the form.

Citizens may still call the Oelwein Police Department

at 319-283-4311 to report violations.

 


 

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.  Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to:

Oelwein City Clerk, 20 Second Avenue SW, Oelwein, IA 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.


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Turn them in to the Oelwein City Hall, 20 2nd Ave SW, when completed.

 
The City of Oelwein publishes agendas and minutes of every city council meeting which are generally open to the public (unless under state law - a closed session is authorized) every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month. To have an item placed on the agenda please contact Oelwein City Hall at 319-283-5440.  We also encourage you to discuss any issues related to city business with the department head or the appropriate City Official for your issue or concern.

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to

Oelwein City Clerk

20 Second Avenue SW

Oelwein Iowa 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 

 
Safety

NationalWeatherService

Weather Conditions - National Weather Service Forecast for Oelwein

----------

 back-to-school-tips

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

BACK TO SCHOOL SAFETY TIPS

Courtesy of safety.lovetoknow.com

Back to School

 

Going back to school is an exciting time for children as they look forward to entering the next grade level, seeing their friends and meeting new people. Yet it can also be a time of unforeseen dangers. By teaching children basic back to school rules and tips regarding their safety, they enter this exciting time with the knowledge and skills they need to stay safe while enjoying this special time and throughout the school year.

 

Safety Tips for Traveling To and From School

 

Whether your child walks to school, rides a bike, takes a bus or you drive them in a car, reviewing the following safety tips with them makes traveling to and from school a safer experience.

 

Walking to School - Tips for Parents

 

If you feel your child does not have adequate pedestrian skills to walk to school, either walk with them until you are confident in their ability or make alternate arrangements for getting them to and from school.

 

  • If a child is young or entering a new school, walk the child to school until you are comfortable with them walking by themselves.
  • Practice the route with your child if they are young or new to the school.
  • Make sure the route your child takes is safe and has a crossing guard at intersections.

 

Walking to School - Tips for Children

 

  • Never take a short cut through a wooded area. Stay on the route you practiced with your parents.
  • Walk to school with a friend or a group of friends.
  • Wearing light or brightly colored clothing increases your visibility to drivers.

 

Traveling by School Bus

 

  • Never step off the curb until the bus comes to a complete stop.
  • Always use the seat belt if the bus if equipped with them.
  • Do not move around in the bus. Stay sitting in your seat.
  • When leaving the school bus stay in view of the driver and always cross the street in front of the bus.
  • Even though traffic should stop for a school bus, always check both ways before crossing the street.

 

Riding a Bike to School

 

  • Always wear an approved helmet when riding a bicycle.
  • Wearing clothing that is bright and colorful makes it easier for drivers to see you.
  • Learn hand signals and use them.
  • Ride a bike on the right hand wide of the road traveling in the same direction as the traffic.
  • Always stop for stop signs and follow the rules of traffic lights.
  • Learn and follow the rules of the road.
  • Do not listen to your iPod mp3 player or other music device. Always pay attention to the traffic.

 

Riding to School in a Car

 

  • Whether you are driving your children or carpooling, make sure each child is securely strapped into their seatbelt. Younger children need the appropriate car seat or booster seat for their age or size.
  • Have each child exit the car using the door on the curbside so they are not stepping out of the car into traffic.
  • Do not leave the school until your child, or all those in the carpool, are safely inside the school building.

 

Backpack Safety

 

Backpacks have become a staple of back to school accessories. They are great for carrying books and other essential school items and are available in a wide variety of sizes, colors, designs and styles. Yet these useful bags are potentially harmful if not used correctly causing possible shoulder or neck injuries, back pain and muscle and joint strains. The following tips on backpack safety help reduce the chance of injury:

 

  • When a backpack is fully loaded, it should not weigh more than 15 to 20 percent of the child's body weight.
  • Never carry a backpack over one shoulder using only one strap. Always wear a backpack using both shoulder straps.
  • If a backpack has a waist strap, use it.
  • Choose a backpack with wide straps. The best choice is a backpack with a padded back and padded straps
  • Use all of the compartments in the backpack to distribute the weight of the contents more evenly.

 

More Back to School Safety Tips

 

The following are a few general back to school safety tips:

 

  • Talk to your children and reinforce the rules of stranger danger.
  • Make sure not to pack foods for lunch or snacks that spoil quickly.
  • Talk to your child about bullies and bullying. Explain to them what to do if a situation arises.

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

safety

The City of Oelwein and the Oelwein Police Department reminds citizens to do their part on the streets of Oelwein. Barricades and warning lights reminds drivers to slow down, obey traffic signs or lights.  Construction zones are needs to address traffic issues or repair city utilities.  Your cooperation and safety awareness is greatly appreciated.

Riding a Bike to School

  • Always wear an approved helmet when riding a bicycle.
  • Wearing clothing that is bright and colorful makes it easier for drivers to see you.
  • Learn hand signals and use them.
  • Ride a bike on the right hand wide of the road traveling in the same direction as the traffic.
  • Always stop for stop signs and follow the rules of traffic lights.
  • Learn and follow the rules of the road.
  • Do not listen to your iPod mp3 player or other music device. Always pay attention to the traffic.

Riding to School in a Car

  • Whether you are driving your children or carpooling, make sure each child is securely strapped into their seatbelt. Younger children need the appropriate car seat or booster seat for their age or size.
  • Have each child exit the car using the door on the curbside so they are not stepping out of the car into traffic.
  • Do not leave the school until your child, or all those in the carpool, are safely inside the school building.
 
Current City News

East Penn Manufacturing Company in Oelwein a step closer in $64 million expansion

East Penn Manufacturing Company of Oelwein is on the verge of a $64 million expansion project.

East Penn was recently awarded $1,750,000 in direct financial assistance as well as tax benefits through Iowa’s High Quality Jobs program, including over $2.2 million over five years in investment tax credits and over $800,000 in refunds of sales, service or use taxes paid during construction. The project is expected to create 350 jobs at a starting wage of at least $13.55 per hour.

In addition, the City of Oelwein would match the State of Iowa’s requirements for High Quality Jobs program, as well as a required match to a DOT Rise grant, and offer tax rebate incentives to East Penn Manufacturing.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

Oelwein’s Kate Stewart crowned Iowa Dairy Princess

Northeast Iowa continues as state Dairy Princess territory with the crowning of Kate Stewart of Oelwein as the 2015 Iowa Dairy Princess. Kate was crowned the 62nd Iowa Dairy Princess by outgoing Princess Mikayla Lien of Calmar, during an evening ceremony at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines Wednesday, Aug. 12.

Kate, 18, is the daughter of Matt and Diana Stewart, and the youngest of the five Stewart siblings that include, Jared, Lindsey, Chelsea, and Daniel. She graduated from Oelwein Community High School in May, where she enjoyed participating in Concert Choir, played the French horn in band, played volleyball and basketball. She is the granddaughter of Norma and the late James Stewart of Oelwein, and Barbara Jean and the late Mike Frick of Sibley.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

 

Williams Center announces its upcoming season line-up

The Williams Center for the Arts in Oelwein, Iowa, is announcing that the purchase of season memberships is now open to the general public.  Each ticket is $150 for Adults.  All season memberships must be purchased at the Oelwein Chamber and Area Development Office.  (319-283-1105)

All of the Center sponsored events are good with the purchase of a Season Membership.  Members also are given the opportunity to select their seats for the entire season.  

All shows start at 7 p.m.

Click here for the 2015-2016 Season Calendar

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 
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