City of Oelwein Online
City of Oelwein Community Portal

 

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"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right
and a desire to know." ~  Pres. John Adams 
 
 
 
You can now pay your utility bill online!
 
Pay Utility Bill Icon
 
 

 
 
fire 1
 
 
Spring Open Burning Dates
 
 
Saturday, April 2nd, 2016 -
 
Saturday, May 14th, 2016
 
between 8AM & 9PM.
 
 
 

  

2016 Swim Lessons Information is now available online. 

 


free-clip-art-water
Turn them in to the Oelwein City Hall, 20 2nd Ave SW, when completed.

 
The City of Oelwein publishes agendas and minutes of every city council meeting which are generally open to the public (unless under state law - a closed session is authorized) every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month. To have an item placed on the agenda please contact Oelwein City Hall at 319-283-5440.  We also encourage you to discuss any issues related to city business with the department head or the appropriate City Official for your issue or concern.

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to

Oelwein City Clerk

20 Second Avenue SW

Oelwein Iowa 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 
Safety

NationalWeatherService

Weather Conditions - National Weather Service Forecast for Oelwein

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 spring2

Spring Safety Tips

 

Top 10 Spring Cleaning Safety Tips

Courtesy of http://www.household-management-101.com/spring-cleaning-safety.html

Spring cleaning safety is not normally on people's minds when they begin to haul out all those cleaning supplies and equipment, but it should be. Everyday we need to be careful when going about our household chores, but when you really start tearing the house apart and moving things around during spring cleaning, especially with all those cleaning supplies and equipment out, it is doubly important to keep safety in mind.

1. Do not rush because you are tired or in a hurry. This is really the most basic spring cleaning safety tip, and all the other ones, at least to a certain degree, stem from this one. Spring cleaning can be tiring work. Do not forget safety even if you have worked hard all day and want to get done. The better thing to do when you are exhausted is to stop and take a break, drink a glass of water, sit under a nice cool fan, and rest instead of being unsafe.

2. Be careful moving large pieces of furniture and appliances. Use proper lifting technique, keeping you back straight and lifting with your legs. Also, wear shoes when moving heavy items so you don't hurt your toes. Finally, if you feel it is just too heavy and you can't find someone else to do it for you, just don't move it. It won't be the end of the world to just clean around it. Always have spring cleaning safety in mind.

3. Be safe while on ladders and step stools. When doing a task, such as washing windows, where you need to be on a ladder use extreme caution. Do not lean too far to either side. A good rule of thumb is that your belly button should not go beyond the sides of the ladder. Also, have someone available to hold the ladder steady for you if possible, and make sure before you step on them that the rungs are not wet, and you are wearing non skid shoes.

4. Be careful when walking on wet surfaces. This spring cleaning safety tip is really important every time you clean. Everyone knows how easy it is to slip on a wet floor. Make sure you take the proper precautions to keep from falling. Also, make sure others in your family, including children, are also warned of the wet floor to keep them safe. You may need to block small children's access to wet floors because they just don't understand not to run and slide on them.

5. Keep stairs, landings, and walkways clear of boxes, bags and other clutter. Spring cleaning is a great time to declutter your home, but you need to make sure all the boxes and bags of stuff you are getting rid of don't cause a safety concern. Make sure you place them outside walkways and especially away from steps and stairs where someone may trip on them.

6. Don't carry too much stuff at once, especially on stairs. During spring cleaning you will also probably go up and down your stairs a lot carrying things if you live in a home with stairs. Make sure you keep a hand free to hold onto the stair railing. Also, whether you have stairs or not, always make sure you can see over the load you are carrying so you do not trip.

7. Always follow cleaning product label safety instructions and recommendations. Cleaning supplies can create nasty fumes, so make sure you get some fresh air by opening windows, turning on the exhaust fan, or placing a fan in the room. In addition, do not mix ammonia and bleach together, both of which are common household cleaners, because they create toxic fumes when combined. When it doubt don't mix, just use one product to get the job done. You should also wear rubber gloves to keep your hands from getting dry and cracked from the hot water and chemicals.

8. Wear a mask when cleaning dusty areas. This may seem like overkill to some, but if you are at all allergic to dust this tip is very important.

9. Do not leave buckets filled with water around your home. Even if you need to take a quick break make sure you empty that cleaning bucket, or at least put it in an inaccessible area. Even small amounts of water are a drowning hazard for small children.

10. Put away all your cleaning supplies when you are done. When you finally finish your spring cleaning tasks for the day it is easy to say to yourself, "I'll put these away later," or "I am just going to use these again tomorrow, so I'm keeping them out." Cleaning supplies are an attractive nuisance for our children and pets, something inviting that they should definitely not be getting into. Put the cleaning products away in a childproof cabinet for your children's safety and well-being as soon as you are done with them.

 

10 Outdoor Safety Tips for Spring

Courtesy of http://safety.blr.com/workplace-safety-news/safety-administration/safety-general/10-outdoor-safety-tips-for-spring/

  1. 1. Wear safety goggles, sturdy shoes, and long pants when using lawn mowers and other machinery.
  2. 2. Protect your hearing when operating machinery. If you have to raise your voice to talk to someone who is an arm’s length away, the noise can be potentially harmful to your hearing.
  3. 3. Make sure equipment is working properly.
  4. 4. Wear gloves to protect from skin irritations, cuts, and contaminants.
  5. 5. Use insect repellant containing DEET.
  6. 6. Follow instructions and warning labels on chemical and lawn and garden equipment.
  7. 7. Reduce the risk of sunburn and skin cancer by wearing long sleeves, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunshades. Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher.
  8. 8. Keep an eye on the thermometer and take precautions in the heat.
  9. 9. When working in hot weather, remind workers to drink plenty of liquids, but not those that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar, as they can cause you to lose body fluid.
  10. 10. Pay attention to signs of heat-related illness, including high body temperature, headache, dizziness, rapid pulse, nausea, confusion, or unconsciousness.

 More Spring Tips

Courtesy of http://www.asecurelife.com/spring-safety-tips/

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

The change of season is always a good reminder to do some periodical check ups on your home. Like getting a physical or a check up at the doctor, it’s important to check in periodically and fix any wear and tear damages to maintain a happy home.

  • Check all your smoke detectors for low batteries. They are no good if they can’t go off!
  • Sign up for a P.O. box and send important mail there to prevent identity theft.
  • Make sure all your door locks are working and install deadbolts on all doors with outside access.
  • Install motion sensitive outdoor lights – not only makes for safety for you but deters criminals from breaking in.
  • Trim your shrubs around the home where burglars can hide when breaking into your home.
  • Go through old files – shred unnecessary paperwork and file away important documents in a fireproof safe.

Traveling for Spring Break? While you are packing up your bags and preparing for a week off, don’t forget the home is an easy target for criminals while you are away. In addition to the usual making sure the neighbors check your mail for you, and locking the doors before you go, here are some extra tips to send you on your way to your stress-free vacation!

  • Resist the urge to broadcast your whereabouts to the world on social media – you’re basically telling burglars you are out-of-town.
  • Going abroad? Call your banks ahead of time to let them know and to find out what if any extra fees you will incur.
  • Turn the thermostat down to around 55 degrees – it will help save on energy and utilities.
  • Don’t leave anything of value out in plain sight, especially near windows.
  • Give a spare key to a reliable and nearby friend, neighbor or family member (or all three). They can periodically go by your house to check on things if need be while you are gone.
  • Check travel advisories before you go and get to know the customs and requirements before you go.

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

safety

The City of Oelwein and the Oelwein Police Department reminds citizens to do their part on the streets of Oelwein. Barricades and warning lights reminds drivers to slow down, obey traffic signs or lights.  Construction zones are needs to address traffic issues or repair city utilities.  Your cooperation and safety awareness is greatly appreciated.

 

 
Current City News

Mayor announces new city administrator hired

DylanCityAdmin

Oelwein Mayor Peggy Sherrets announced Wednesday that the city has hired a new city administrator. Dylan J. Mulfinger of Oskaloosa officially returned a signed contract Wednesday morning.

Mayor Sherrets said that she and the city council are very pleased and excited to welcome Mulfinger to Oelwein.

“Dylan is very positive and enthusiastic about coming to Oelwein,” Sherrets said. “He is very knowledgeable about city government and gave the impression of being a good problem-solver.”

 Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

Making 2016 Oelwein’s Best

Mayor of Oelwein Peggy Sherrets is looking forward to the New Year and “continuing to move forward.”

Mayor Sherrets said that the city of Oelwein has a “great city council now,” and one that is younger, stable, and more diverse.

Working together with the positive, forward looking council, Mayor Sherrets is quick to recognize that the old negative attitudes that loomed over the city have since gone away.

“It has been very positive and upbeat around town,” said Mayor Sherrets.

Mayor Sherrets hopes to increase discussion with the public in 2016 and hear their grievances in an effort to continue improving communication and increase positive attitudes in town.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

Sherrets sworn in as Oelwein’s 36th mayor

Mayor Peggy Sherrets took the oath of office Wednesday morning, Dec. 30, to begin her first full two-year term at the helm of city government. Sherrets has served as Oelwein’s mayor since winning a special election in October 2014.

As she signed the official paperwork, Sherrets became the 36th mayor for the city and the second female to hold its highest office.

Sherrets began in city government as 1st Ward Councilman elected in 2011. Among her duties was being appointed as the council’s pro-tem mayor. She proved her mettle two years later when scandal hit the mayor’s office and she was forced to assume mayoral duties.

Refusing to let allegations of another factor into the workings of the city, Sherrets made “moving forward” a practical solution to righting the ship in rocky waters.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

City Elections Tuesday, Nov. 3rd

Oelwein Mayor Peggy Sherrets received 437 votes

At-Large Councilman: Darin Christensen received 319 votes over incumbent Paul Ryan with 268 votes

First Ward Councilman: Matt Weber received 147 votes

Third Ward Councilman: Lou Ann Milks received 103 votes

 

 

Council works on cleaning up neighborhoods

The Oelwein City Council approved measures on three properties Monday night aimed at improving neighborhoods.

The first was a resolution setting a public hearing for 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 to propose disposal by sale of the city’s interest in 105 S. Frederick, the former Iowa Motors building.

The second was setting a public hearing also at 5 p.m. Nov. 9 for disposal by sale of the city’s interest in 136 Fourth Ave. S.W. Roger Boleyn, who at one time previously owned the property, has expressed interest. City Attorney Ron VanVeldhuizen reported Boleyn intends to purchase the property and take down the house.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

Oelwein’s Mercy Hospital part of Wheaton’s merge with Mercy Health Network

Mercy Hospital in Oelwein along with Covenant Medical Center in Waterloo and Sartori Hospital in Cedar Falls, will be transferred to the Des Moines based Mercy Health Network.

The Wheaton Franciscan Sisters have announced their intent to form a new relationship for their Iowa hospitals and services located in Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and Oelwein. The intention is for these organizations to join Mercy Health Network (MHN), based in West Des Moines, an integrated system of hospitals, clinics and other health and patient care facilities working to achieve the “triple aim goals” of better health care services, better health, and higher efficiency. The transfer is contingent upon final negotiations of definitive agreements, the receipt of all required approvals, and is expected to take place in the first quarter of calendar year 2016.

The Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare hospitals, clinics and other services including Covenant Medical Center, Sartori Memorial Hospital, and Mercy Hospital of Franciscan Sisters, Oelwein, are the subjects of the proposed transfer.

 Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

East Penn Manufacturing Company in Oelwein a step closer in $64 million expansion

East Penn Manufacturing Company of Oelwein is on the verge of a $64 million expansion project.

East Penn was recently awarded $1,750,000 in direct financial assistance as well as tax benefits through Iowa’s High Quality Jobs program, including over $2.2 million over five years in investment tax credits and over $800,000 in refunds of sales, service or use taxes paid during construction. The project is expected to create 350 jobs at a starting wage of at least $13.55 per hour.

In addition, the City of Oelwein would match the State of Iowa’s requirements for High Quality Jobs program, as well as a required match to a DOT Rise grant, and offer tax rebate incentives to East Penn Manufacturing.

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 

 

Williams Center announces its upcoming season line-up

The Williams Center for the Arts in Oelwein, Iowa, is announcing that the purchase of season memberships is now open to the general public.  Each ticket is $150 for Adults.  All season memberships must be purchased at the Oelwein Chamber and Area Development Office.  (319-283-1105)

All of the Center sponsored events are good with the purchase of a Season Membership.  Members also are given the opportunity to select their seats for the entire season.  

All shows start at 7 p.m.

Click here for the 2015-2016 Season Calendar

Courtesy of the Oelwein Daily Register.

 
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