City of Oelwein Online
City of Oelwein Community Portal

oelweinbiketrail

"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right
and a desire to know." ~  Pres. John Adams 
Like on Facebook
 

camp fire animated

Burn Ban in Fayette County is lifted.

Open Burning in Oelwein

Now through Saturday, May 16th, 2015

Open burning is only for vegetation that grows on your property only.

Burning shall be allowed between 8AM and 9PM only

No furniture, finished wood, clothing, lumber, building materials, flammable liquids etc. is allowed to be burned.

Click here for more information


 

 

 

2015ProjectFitness

 


 

Visit the Oelwein Police Department's website

for a new, easy way to report 

property nuisance violations in Oelwein.

Click on the red tab along the left side of the screen

on their website called

"Report Property Nuisance Violation"

and fill out the form.

Citizens may still call the Oelwein Police Department

at 319-283-4311 to report violations.

 


 

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.  Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to:

Oelwein City Clerk, 20 Second Avenue SW, Oelwein, IA 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.


free-clip-art-water
Turn them in to the Oelwein City Hall, 20 2nd Ave SW, when completed.

 
The City of Oelwein publishes agendas and minutes of every city council meeting which are generally open to the public (unless under state law - a closed session is authorized) every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month. To have an item placed on the agenda please contact Oelwein City Hall at 319-283-5440.  We also encourage you to discuss any issues related to city business with the department head or the appropriate City Official for your issue or concern.

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE

103’ X 170’

Located in the 900 block of 5th Street SE.

Water & Sewer in Street.Paved Street, Curb & Gutter.

The City of Oelwein is accepting offers (minimum

$15,000) on Lot 2, Vine Addition to Oelwein.

Offers should be submitted to

Oelwein City Clerk

20 Second Avenue SW

Oelwein Iowa 50662.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

 

 
Safety

NationalWeatherService

Weather Conditions - National Weather Service Forecast for Oelwein

----------

 spring2

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

 SPRING SAFETY TIPS

Courtesy of bcfma.org

Scooter, Bike and Pedestrian Safety

Scooters, bikes, in-line skates and skateboards are associated with numerous injuries yearly.

  • Wear a comfortable, properly fitted helmet bearing the label of an independent testing lab. Be sure that the helmet sits level on top of the head–not rocking in any direction–and always fasten the safety strap.
  • Be sure that safety gear (wrist, elbow and kneepads) fits properly and does not interfere with the rider's movement, vision or hearing. Wrist pads are not recommended for scooter riders as they may affect their ability to maneuver.
  • Ride scooters and bikes only on smooth, paved surfaces and only ride during daylight hours.
    Learn the proper hand signals and use them when you turn or stop.
  • Come to a complete stop before entering driveways, paths or sidewalks, then look left, right and left again for bikes, cars or pedestrians heading your way.
  • Teach crossing safety to children by example

Barbecue Safety

Beware when you barbecue. In 1998 alone, there were 6,100 reported home fires involving gas or charcoal grills in the U.S., leading to $29.1 million in direct property damage, according to NFPA.

  • When using barbecue grills always be sure to leave sufficient space from siding and eaves.
  • New Jersey law forbids any grill to be utilized on the balconies of an apartment, townhouse or condominium.
  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  • Keep children and pets far away from grills.
  • With charcoal grills, only use charcoal starter fluids designed for barbecue grills and do not add fluid after coals have been lit.
  • With gas grills, be sure that the hose connection is tight and check hoses carefully for leaks. Applying soapy water to the hoses will easily and safely reveal any leaks.
  • Always follow the manufacturer's instructions and have the grill repaired by a professional, if necessary. Spare propane cylinders should never be stored indoors or under or near the grill.

Water Safety

Extra caution should be used when around water, for children and adults.

  • Only swim in approved areas.
  • Always supervise children near water at all times and make sure that children learn to swim.
  • Check the depth of the water with a lifeguard before jumping in.
  • Always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved PFD (personal floatation device) when boating, jet-skiing, tubing or water-skiing. Air-filled swimming aids, like water wings or inner tubes, are not substitutes for approved PFDs. An adult should always supervise children using these devices.
  • Be sure to extinguish all smoking materials and shut down motors, fans and heating devices before fueling a boat. In case of a spill, wipe up fuel immediately and check the bilge for fuel leakage and odors. After fueling and before starting the boat's motor, ventilate with the blower for at least four minutes

Cleaning For Safety

  • Nature is undergoing a fresh start and so are homeowners who are ready to clean up the debris that has been accumulating in basements, storage sheds and garages over the winter.
  • Household and pool chemicals, paints and poisons should be properly marked and stored under lock and key, away from children's reach. Dispose of any that are leaking, expired, or that look bad.
  • When cleaning up hazardous chemicals, wear rubber gloves and follow the safety directions on the packaging. Never mix chemicals in the same container. If you don't know how to dispose of them, seek outside advice. Never put them in the trash or pour them down the drain.
  • Make sure gasoline and cleaning fluids are well-marked and stored in a cool, dry place away from the house and out of reach of children and pets. Use only approved containers for gasoline storage.
  • Never use gasoline to clean skin, clothes, auto parts or floors.
  • Clean up work areas. Put dangerous tools, adhesives, matches or other work items away from children's reach.
  • Remove all fire hazards, including stacks of rags, newspapers and magazines. Pay special attention to the spaces around your furnace, hot water tank, fireplace, space heaters and dryer, as well as under your stairs.


Yard Work Safety

Itching to get the yard into shape for the summer? Here are ways to help ensure your spring spruce-up is disaster-free.

  • Always wear protective clothing when you handle pesticides and fertilizers.
  • More than 60,000 people are treated in emergency rooms each year for lawn-mower injuries:
  • Rake before you mow to prevent any stones and loose debris from launching into the air
  • Never operate a mower in your bare feet and avoid wearing loose clothing.
  • Never start a mower indoors.
  • Refueling your mower, make sure the engine is off and cool. Don't spill gasoline on a hot engine - and DON'T SMOKE while pouring gasoline.
  • Never leave your mower unattended.
  • Don't use electrical mowers on wet grass.
  • At least 55,000 people each year sustain injuries from trimmers, lawn edgers, pruners and power saws:
  • Read the manufacturer's instructions carefully before using the tools.
  • Inspect the product for damage and don't use it if there are problems.
  • Use proper eye protection.
  • Make sure blade guards are in place on all cutting equipment.
  • Don't let tools get wet unless they are labeled "immersible.
  • Unplug all tools when not in use.
  • Make sure the tool is in the "off" position before you plug it in.
  • Store gasoline-powered equipment away from anything that uses a pilot light.
  • Make sure you use the right saw for the task, and always wait for the saw blade to stop before pulling away from a cut to avoid kickback.
  • When pruning trees, be careful not to let metal ladders or trimmers contact overhead wires.
  • Before you do any "hands on" weed removal, be sure you know how to identify poison ivy, sumac, oak and similar toxic plants. Find out ahead of time how to treat the rashes they cause to reduce the irritation.

Outdoor Safety

Ready for some outdoor exercise and adventure? Here are a few pointers:

  • Winter's inactive muscles can take only so much strain. Don't overdo it - build up slowly so you don't have strains that can put you out of commission for some time.
  • It may look appealing, but don't wander onto frozen rivers and lakes in the spring. The ice is beginning to thaw, and you never know just how thin the ice really is.
  • Spring's extra rain and thawing snow can cause normally safe rivers, streams and creeks to turn treacherous. Even standing on banks can be risky, as they can be undercut by the rushing water and give in under your weight.
  • Springtime can also be severe weather time. If the skies look threatening, check to see if a storm watch or warning has been issued before you initiate outdoor activities. If you're already outside and thunderstorms threaten, go immediately into a building or enclosed vehicle. For tornadoes, go to the nearest safe structure, or the basement or interior first-floor room of your home. If there's no time to follow these precautions, take cover in a ditch or depression in the ground.

Ladder Safety

  • Read the manufacturer's instructions that come with your ladder. They contain guidelines for weight and height limits as well as for the proper use of their product.
  • Inspect the ladder before using it to make sure there are no loose or broken rungs.
  • Make sure the ladder is the right height for the job. Many accidents happen when people overextend their reach because their ladders are too short.
  • Never stand on a ladder's bucket shelf.
  • Make sure the ladder is completely open, and that all of its feet are planted on a firm, level surface. Extension ladders should not be placed at an angle that is too extreme.
  • Avoid using a metal ladder near electrical sources.
  • Face the ladder when climbing down and make sure your weight is centered between the two sides.

Camping Safety Tips

  • Always use a flame retardant tent and set up camp far away from the campfire.
  • Only use flashlights or battery-powered lanterns inside the tent or any other closed space, not liquid-filled heaters or lanterns.
  • Always build your campfire down wind away from your tent. Clear all vegetation and dig a pit surrounded by rocks before building your campfire.
  • Store liquid fire starter (not gasoline) away from your tent and campfire and only use dry kindling to freshen a campfire.
  • Always put out a campfire when going to sleep or leaving the campsite. To extinguish the fire, cover with dirt or pour water over it

Fireworks

Fireworks lead to thousands of injuries requiring emergency room treatment, according to NFPA. These dazzling, but dangerous devices can burn up to 1200 F and can cause burns, lacerations, amputations and blindness. Stay safe by always leaving fireworks to professionals.

  • Stay back at least 500 feet from professional fireworks displays.
  • Treat all fireworks, whether legal or illegal for consumers, as suitable only for use by trained professionals.
  • If you find fireworks, do not touch them but instead direct authorities to them.
  • Leave any area where amateurs are using fireworks.

 

Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.  Please feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

What to Wear

 
  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat.
 
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred. 
 
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.
 

 Hypothermia

 
  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
 
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
 
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.
 

Frostbite

 
  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
 
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
 
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
 
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
 
  • If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.
 
 

Winter Health

 
  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
 
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
 
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.
 

Winter Sports and Activities

 
  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
 
  •  Using alcohol or drugs before any winter activity, like snowmobiling or skiing, is dangerous and should not be permitted in any situation.
 

Ice Skating

 

 

 
  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces.  Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
 
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads, especially while learing to skate
 
Sledding
 
  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Children should be supervised while sledding.
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.
  • Use steerable sleds, not snow disks or inner tubes.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.
 
Snow Skiing and Snowboarding
 
  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.
 
Snowmobiling
 
  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
 
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
 
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
 
  • Travel at safe speeds.
 
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
 
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.
 

 Sun Protection

 

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

 
Fire Protection
 


Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

 
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
 
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
 
  • Practice fire drills with your children
 
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
 
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping
- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Winter-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.E1cqRXyi.dpuf

safety

The City of Oelwein and the Oelwein Police Department reminds citizens to do their part on the streets of Oelwein. Barricades and warning lights reminds drivers to slow down, obey traffic signs or lights.  Construction zones are needs to address traffic issues or repair city utilities.  Your cooperation and safety awareness is greatly appreciated.

 
Current City News

spring-cleaning

Scheduled for Saturday, May 9th - More information coming soon.

 

Oelwein Police Winter Coat Drive

2014 Winter Coat Drive Graphic

 

The Oelwein Police Department sponsored a winter coat drive during the months of November and December 2014. The original goal was to receive at least 100 coats and on December 18th, 2014, the police department announced they were no longer accepting donations due to so many donations. They had received 304 coats, 15 pairs of boots, 30 hats, 25 gloves, 13 scarfs and 10 pairs of snow pants. The smaller winter apparel was turned over to Wings Park Elementary staff and the adult apparel was given to Full circle Services. They will assist in finding homes for the donations within our community.

 

Oelwein Homecoming Parade 2014 Pictures

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming1

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming3

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming4

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming5

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming8

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming10

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming11

9-26-14OelweinHomecoming17

 

 

RAGBRAI 2014 a Success in Oelwein

 

RAGBRAI2014 3

RAGBRAI2014 4

 

City of Oelwein Held The Annual Safety Awards Ceremony on July 16, 2014

The city of Oelwein takes safety seriously. Each year they hold a Safety Awards Ceremony to not only reward employees but to promote work safety. The annual Safety Awards Ceremony (for fiscal year 2013-2014) was held on July 16th, 2014 at the Grand Theatre of Oelwein and the Oelwein Community Plaza. The city employees that were in attendance were presented with certificates showing how many continuous hours they worked without an injury. All of the city departments and city employees in attendance were presented with certificates from Oelwein City Council members Paul Ryan and Renee Cantrell and Administrator Jamie Letzring.

7-16-14SafetyAdmin

Administration

7-16-14SafetyCemetary

Cemetary

7-16-14SafetyFire

Fire

7-16-14SafetyLibrary

Library

7-16-14SafetyParks

Parks

7-16-14SafetyPolice

Police

7-16-14SafetyStreets

Streets

7-16-14SafetyUtilities

Utilities

 
free pokerfree poker